Jeep Grand Cherokees and Rangers are known for their ruggedness and off-road performance.  That’s why if you’ve got a Jeep transmission defect, there’s nothing worse.  You probably bought a Jeep for its reliability and toughness, and that makes transmission problems doubly frustrating.  If this describes your situation, read on, because following is some information you may find useful and options that could help solve your problem.

There are several things you can do if you have a Jeep transmission defect – from scouting for a recall (which means the defect gets fixed free of charge) to exploring whether you have a Jeep lemon law claim.

If you have Jeep transmission problems, a skilled and experienced lemon law attorney may be able to help.  Neale & Fhima has represented many clients just like you who own defective Jeep vehicles.  We have a 99% success rate in winning legal claims for clients, and we pride ourselves on exceptional client service.  To explore your legal options under California’s lemon law, call us for a free initial consultation at (888) 407-2955.

How to Identify a Jeep Transmission Defect

Transmission problems have tell-tale signs that are pretty easy to detect, according to Firestone Complete Auto Care.  These include:

  • Transmission shifting delays
  • Transmission slipping, grinding or jumping
  • Jeep shaking at any speed
  • A burnt smell coming from under the hood
  • Fluid visibly leaking from the Jeep
  • Clunking, whistling or screeching sounds.

Some common causes include:

  • Low or dirty transmission fluidi caused by leaking, contamination, or age
  • Worn gear synchronizers (manual transmission systems only)
  • Worn clutch (manual transmission systems only)
  • Failed needle roller bearings (automatic transmission systems only).

These are all discussed in greater detail at Firestone.  One or more of these may be worth looking into.  Torque converter problems and solenoid problems (controls the flow of fluid through the transmission) are also something to watch out for, according to CarsDirect.

Dealerships won’t pay for all Jeep transmission problems, but they will pay for some.  If a manufacturer’s recall is in effect for specific model years and yours qualifies, the dealership may fix it for free.  There can be multiple recalls for different defects over the life of a vehicle, so it’s worth doing your research and checking back from time to time to see if any new recalls have been issued.  If there is no recall for your Jeep transmission defect, then your best legal option may be to file a lemon law claim.

California’s Lemon Law

California has one of the most consumer-friendly Jeep lemon laws in the nation, and a skilled lawyer at Neale & Fhima can help determine whether you have a legal claim.  Under the Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty Act, if you purchase a defective Jeep that has a manufacturer’s warranty, you are legally entitled to a refund, or the vehicle can be replaced at the manufacturer’s cost. Even if you purchased a used Jeep, you may have a lemon law claim under specific circumstances. At Neale & Fhima, we fight the big automakers to enforce the lemon law rights of our clients. Call us at (888) 407-2955 for a free initial consultation about your case.

Neale & Fhima has a 99% success rate in winning financial compensation for our clients. Contact us today at (888) 407-2955

Is Your Jeep a Lemon?

A Jeep “lemon” is a vehicle that has a chronic defect and doesn’t live up to the standards of a safe, reliable vehicle.  Whether it’s due to a defective transmission or other problems, a Jeep lemon never functions correctly no matter how many times you take it to a mechanic.  To determine whether you have a Jeep lemon law claim, check to see whether your vehicle is still under the original manufacturer’s warranty. If it is, you probably have a claim.  If you own a used vehicle, then you will need one of three specific warranties to have a Jeep lemon law claim. Either way, you need to have made a “reasonable number of attempts” to get your Jeep transmission repaired before filing a legal claim.

The statute of limitations under California’s Lemon Law is four years from the purchase date to file a claim. If you have purchased or leased a lemon, start collecting copies of your repair bills now.  You will need these to prove that you made good-faith attempts to get your vehicle repaired.

To have a successful claim, the Lemon Law in California stipulates that your Jeep must have “nonconformities,” which are defined as any defect or malfunction that is covered by the manufacturer’s original warranty. Nonconformities compromise the use, value or safety of the vehicle. A skilled and experienced Jeep lemon law attorney can explain in greater detail what qualifies as a “nonconformity” and help determine whether you have a warranty that qualifies. Call us at (888) 407-2955.

If it turns out that you have a Jeep lemon, your options are 1) to have Jeep repurchase or replace your vehicle or 2) negotiate a cash settlement with Jeep. Find out more in: What to Do if You Have a Lemon.

When you file a lemon law claim, the process commences by sending a demand letter to Jeep.  One of our Jeep lemon law attorneys at Neale & Fhima can do this for you.  Our attorneys expect resistance from the manufacturer, because the company’s lawyers work hard to limit Jeep’s liability, but our attorneys are tough and we fight aggressively for our clients. Find out more in: The Lemon Law Claims Process.

Contact a Jeep defective transmission lawyer today

If you own a Jeep Wrangler, Grand Cherokee, Renegade or any other vehicle manufactured by Jeep that is having chronic transmission problems, it’s a huge headache that can make life difficult for you, day in, day out.  You may have a legal remedy.  If your Jeep shimmies, shakes or jerks when it is changing gears, then it is likely a transmission problem.  To find out more and get an analysis of whether you might have a legal claim, contact a skilled and experienced attorney today at Neale & Fhima.  The consultation is free, so why not call us at (888) 407-2955.  What do you have to lose?